Posts Tagged With: Wildebeest

XVII: Kruger National Park Part II & Sabie

Sabie, South Africa from Jordan Bierma on Vimeo.

Giraffe

Giraffe

Ground Squirrel

Ground Squirrel

Brown-Hooded Kingfisher

Brown-Hooded Kingfisher

June 27th 2012:

We got up at 5 a.m. less excited then the previous morning but still managed to get things together and make it to the gate as it opened at 6 a.m.  We seemed to be off to another flying start as we came upon a group of large male elephants having an early morning snack in the trees on the side of the road.  After the initial sighting things dried up as we had a couple hours of nothing but a few impala, and birds here and there.  Around 10 a.m. things finally picked up a little as we found a hippo and a small croc with their noses just above the water.  From there we headed back towards lunch/toilets, and when you have to go to the bathroom you seem to run into everything.  First a herd of elephants about 15-20 strong, with a slightly aggressive male who made us keep our distance, since there were a number of young ones weaving there way in and out between the adults legs.  As we continued back a strange sight we hadn’t encountered yet appeared.  An initial group of 15-20 vultures, and other birds of prey were perched in two trees side by side.  The longer we waited the more the group swelled.  Up until about 50-60 birds, with 3 different species of vultures, and a handful of other birds of prey in the trees and circling above. It was a sight to be seen that was difficult to capture in the car.

Marabou Stork

Marabou Stork

Tree of Vultures

Tree of Vultures

In Flight

In Flight

Landing

Landing

White-Backed Vulture

White-Backed Vulture

After lunch, full, and still a bit tired from the day before, and with no intentions of being even remotely close to being late we perched ourselves at a watering hole and waited for the show to come to us.  It came in the form of a hippo, an elephant, a fish eagle, wooly storks, and a giraffe, which had two tiny hooves of a baby giraffe poking out the back end of her.  We watched and waited intently hoping we would witness a giraffe giving birth.  She stuck around and we watched for about 2 hours of which no progress was made.  The giraffe a relatively young female, didn’t seem to be giving any heed to the body parts hanging out of her.  She kept on grazing and we eventually lost sight of her as she disappeared into the trees.

Pearl-Spotted Owlet

Pearl-Spotted Owlet

Personal Treehouse Hide

Personal Treehouse Hide

South Africa 2012

South Africa 2012

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XVI: Kruger National Park Part I

Kruger National Park, South Africa from Jordan Bierma on Vimeo.

Stripe-Bellied Sand Snake

Stripe-Bellied Sand Snake

Red-Billed Hornbill

Red-Billed Hornbill

Burchell's Zebra (Photo by Sarah)

Burchell’s Zebra (Photo by Sarah)

June 25th 2012
We headed out from Pigg’s Peak north, to the Jeppe’s Reef border crossingto get back into South Africa. I could not have had an easier border crossing, we simply pulled up, got our books stamped and drive through, no questions asked, no search of the vehicle, just a friendly “hello”, and “safe travels” to bid us farewell. We were finally on our way to Kruger National Park, a place I has stored away in my memory as a child as a seemingly endless Eden filled with every African animal one could imagine. We were unfortunately coinciding with the winter break holiday of South African schools and everything in the park was booked solid. I knew the park was popular, but with it being the size of the country of Wales I had figured there would’ve been at least a few options in one of the many camps scattered throughout the park. Sarah came to the rescue though. Her travel coordinator for her field camp, Nicole, was South African, and her mom had just purchased a place in Marloth Park just outside of Kruger to rent out as a bush lodge. Nicole’s mom gave us a more then generous discount, which we were extremely grateful for, and allowed us to be their very first guests. We got there and lifted our jaws back up into our mouths as we parked our car under the stilts that held up the huge house. Everything was brand new and immaculate, thatched roof, hardwood floors, and beds for atleast sleeping 10 people. To cap it off it was only a short drive to the Southern gates of Kruger. The deck stood out from the house to make a little stilted hide with a bed and a hammock that overlooked the private lion sanctuary of Marloth Park. The first night of our four-night stay we spent curled up in the bed outside listening to the roar of lions out in the distance somewhere in the dark.

Hyena in the Sunrise

Hyena in the Sunrise

Buffalo and Egret

Buffalo and Egret

Wildebeest

Wildebeest

June 26th 2012
We both hardly slept at least I know I hardly slept, with the anticipation of our first day at Kruger. We were up early around 5:30 a.m. and made some lunch for the day and got to the gate around 6:30 a.m., a half hour after it opened. We were off to a flying start, seeing a hyena not 10 minutes into the drive, followed by a herd of buffalo, three white rhinos; a small herd of elephants, and an all but too brief glimpse of a lion almost all within the first 2-3 hours. The bird life, and small mammals seemed to fill in the gaps; Eagle owls, Lilac Breasted Rollers, Magpies, Coucals, Kingfishers, Warthogs, Impala, Steenbok, Kudu, and much, much more. The mornings are by far the best times to see things. By the mid-afternoon heat your best bet is to find a watering hole and stake out and have some lunch. We ended at a nice spot, a little crowded with people on holiday setting up their afternoon braai areas, but it was a good view of hippos in the water, and waterbucks on the shore.

Lilac-Breasted Roller

Lilac-Breasted Roller

Glossy Starling

Glossy Starling

Steenbok

Steenbok

After lunch we continued along and found a group of about 8-10 giraffes that we kept company with for a while. We continued on, spurred on by another hot tip from a passing motorist about possible lions further up the road. Without hesitating we ventured further on eventually finding a young male lion. He almost perfectly blended in with the scenery with the exception of an ear poking up out of the grass to give him away. He was just lounging on the ground not more then 25 feet from us taking in the setting sun. It was quite surreal and we seemed to be lost in the moment as the lion would occasionally turn his head towards us and look with disinterest.
We had failed to notice the time of day and our distance to the gate. It was 4:50 p.m. and the gate closed at 5:30 p.m. and we were much more than 40 minutes away. The gate policy is quite strict since driving in the dark is quite the hazard for people and animals alike. There is also been an increase of Rhino poaching so unauthorized activity after the gates closed probably looks suspicious. We cruised a little bit over the suggested speed limit hoping there might be a grace period or a sympathetic ranger who would let us through since it was our first day at the park. As the light faded our drive seemed to take forever and we finally made it to the gate at 5:50 p.m. to locked gates and a ranger standing there with a flashlight. I am sure we hadn’t been the first late arrival they had had in their history. The ranger opened the gate for us and gave us the phone number of the head ranger, Neels, to whom I would have to call to explain why I was late and the consequences. After a bit of talking I managed to dissuade him from applying the 1500R fine, and instead getting a very very stern warning. They took our license plate number to be sure it didn’t happen again. I will have to apologize in advance to the next person who rents the car and takes it to Kruger. I used their one freebie. We made the drive back, exhausted; we ate, and passed out so we could be fresh for tomorrow.

Lion (Photo by Sarah)

Lion (Photo by Sarah)

Lion in the Sunset

Lion in the Sunset

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VI: Mountain Zebra National Park, South Africa

May 29th: Mountain Zebra National Park, South Africa

I slept in, getting up at half past six.  I had a short couple hour drive about 200km(125 miles) north to Cradock, and just beyond that Mountain Zebra National Park.  The drive was one of the more fun roads I had driven with bending turns and rolling hills that seemed to last forever.  During my drive I worked my way from the lush coastal forests to the arid Karoo.  I made a short stop in Cradock to re-fuel, buy more food, and use the Internet, which unlike most of South Africa was surprisingly quick.  This dusty computer in the corner of a small electronic shop finally gave me the opportunity to get the plane tickets for Sarah and I to fly from Cape Town to Durban after we met up.  I was then off to Mountain Zebra National Park. I set up my dust-covered tent and went for a short hike to get my legs moving again.  In the vast majority of national parks and reserves in South Africa you have to remain in your vehicle when you are in the park, with a few designated areas where you can get out.  It is understandable from a liability perspective for the parks because there are a number of dangerous animals most people wouldn’t want to run into on foot.  It was hard for me to get used to at first since I am used to the freedom to explore in the parks and forests of the USA.  Mountain Zebra National Park was a good mix of the two.  It had cordoned off hiking areas that contained no large predators, and the largest area of the park containing roads for viewing from your car.

After dinner I took a short drive on a couple small loops to watch the sunset, but I found much more to keep me occupied.  Lo and behold about 15 minutes into the drive I found a pair of the elusive Cape Mountain Zebra grazing on the edge of the mountainside.  The Mountain Zebra were hunted into near extinction in the early 20th century with as few as 100 remaining but through conservation efforts after the 1930s the population is now just over 2,000.  The mountain zebra are generally shorter and stockier then Burchell’s Zebra and are built for climbing steep terrain.  They also have a reddish nose and a dewlap, which is a loose fold of skin on their neck, which aren’t found on Burchell’s Zebra.  The rest of the drive the sightings were sparse with a few Kudu and Eland.  The mountains are different then any I have seen before with grassy slopes interspersed with giant rolling bald sections of smooth barren rock.  The sweet thorn that grows everywhere makes the environment seem all that more harsh.

May 30th: Mountain Zebra National Park

One of the most spectacular sunrises yet, I was up at six and was able to get to the top of the plateau that overlooks the park just as the sun poked its head out from behind the mountains.  From the plateau I was able to head out on some short drives to spot animals in the morning light.  I was not disappointed and saw herds of black wildebeest and springbok.  The highlight of the day came around 10 a.m. when I came across a group of about 10-15 buffalo.  The huge, but often shy creatures were packed into a dense thicket and it was hard to get a clear view, but I did spot a few little ones who would occasionally get away from their parents and poke their head out to see what hubbub was all about.  During the heat of the day I relaxed in the shade of my tent to enjoy the mountain views and the smaller creatures of the Karoo.  My favorite being the small mice that would constantly be popping up on rocks checking if the coast was clear.  They also had the amazing ability to navigate up and into sweet thorn trees to munch on the seedpods.  With unbelievable speed they would weave their way through the tangle of massive thorns on the branches.  The tree also provided them cover from hungry birds with the large thorns preventing a safe landing spot.  To cap off the remaining hours of daylight I took a short hike to watch the baboons from afar chase each other around on the giant rocks.  I returned to my campsite for another redundant meal, one which I had the last four meals, of bread, cheese, sun-dried tomatoes, sun-dried fruit and buttermilk rusks.

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Gianaclis Caldwell

Cheese, Cheesemaking, and Small Dairy

Around the world with Weston & Dana

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